A New Covenant Prayer

He (h) Stanza (33-40)

Introduction

How often do we pray for our spiritual growth? We legitimately pray for all kinds of needs and concerns, but how often do we pray that God would grow and change us from the inside out?

This stanza is a prayer for growth from a changed heart. There are many New Covenant themes in this prayer. It is interesting to muse on Daniel meditating on the New Covenant promises in Jer. 31:31-34 and 32:39-40, and then praying those promises back to God. We know Daniel had access to Jeremiah’s prophecy and prayed about what he read (Dan. 9:2-4). Regardless, this is a wonderful prayer for us to pray today.

O LORD, Teach Me (33-34)

33 Teach me, O Lord, the way of Your statutes,

And I shall observe it to the end.

34 Give me understanding, that I may observe Your law

And keep it with all my heart.

The first petition in this stanza is for God to teach and give understanding to His child. He uses God’s covenant name (Yahweh) and is asking for “transcendent tutoring” (Zemek, 136). He knows that if he is taught of God, he will obey, every day, all the way. When God the Holy Spirit is our teacher the result is full heart obedience to the end.

Lord, Change My Heart (35-36)

35 Make me walk in the path of Your commandments,

For I delight in it.

36 Incline my heart to Your testimonies

And not to dishonest gain.

The next petition is for God to cause His child to march along in the path of God’s commandments. The path he desires is the beautiful path of God’s law, it is his delight. For the Psalmist, God’s commandments are not burdensome, but rather they are delightful. Immediately he prays that God would be inclining or turning his heart, sustaining that desire. The Psalmist knows himself well enough to know that every day is a battle over what we will take delight in. He knows the inner conflicts of remaining sin. So he looks to God to sustain him with a willing spirit and delighting heart.

We cannot fail to notice the last line of v. 36, “and not to material gain.” Do you remember the offers made to Daniel if he would interpret the dream (Dan. 5:13-17)? Daniel had already prospered (Dan. 2:48). In this petition, the Psalmist asks God to change his heart and to keep his heart from wanting the wrong things.

Lord, Protect My Eyes (37)

37 Turn away my eyes from looking at vanity,

And revive me in Your ways.

The Psalmist knows where he is prone to look. How about us? Do we know where our eyes are prone to wander? He wants God to keep his eyes away from “vanity,” this word means “a vapor, a breath,” and by extension, that which is morally valueless. This describes the things of this world, the lust of the eyes. The Psalmist pleads that God would turn his eyes away from the world and would revive him. God’s life-giving, reviving power can break the attraction of the nothingness of the world.

Lord, Confirm Your Word (38)

38 Establish Your word to Your servant,

As that which produces reverence for You.

To “establish, “ or “confirm,” may have the idea of fulfill. The Psalmist may have in mind a specific word or promise. The reason that word needs to be established or fulfilled is because it produces godly fear. Charles Bridges wonderfully paraphrases, “Whatsoever, therefore, thy covenant has provided for my sanctification, my humiliation, my chastisement, my present and everlasting consolation – ‘Stablish this word:’ let it be fulfilled in me; for I am ‘thy servant, devoted to thy fear’” (94).

Lord, Take Away My Disgrace (39)

39 Turn away my reproach which I dread,

For Your ordinances are good.

The reproach of the enemy is a common theme in the Psalms. The Psalmist dreads such reproaches, not because they hurt his feelings, but because his testimony is at stake. He did not want to bring dishonor to his God.

Lord, Revive Me (40)

40 Behold, I long for Your precepts;

Revive me through Your righteousness.

He concludes this stanza with familiar but vibrant words. He longs for God’s Word and he longs for God to renew his heart through His righteousness. The reason he appeals to revival through God’s righteousness is because God’s righteousness is not only judgment on the wicked, it is also deliverance or salvation for His people.

Application

The New Covenant blessings have been secured for us by Christ and His blood. These blessings are a new heart, with new desires, empowered obedience and perseverance. To pray to God for what He has already promised has a wonderful power to it. Child of God, learn to plead the promises of the New Covenant!